Lynne P Hollingsworth Fine Art
“Art must be an expression of love or it is nothing.” Marc Chagall 

Blog

(posted on 24 Nov 2016)

As you will see as we move on together, what, I am really talking about is a renewal of creative energy, a desire to try new things, expand my repertoire, stretch my artistic muscles so to speak. Artists have these epiphanies now and again, when they see in their mind’s eye, a call to take a road not travelled thus far, and this has been one for me.

I must include here, that my enthusiastic launch proved to be less that stellar. I am working on a painting of roses, using an instructional video as a starting point, and my new mantra is “who knew roses could fight BACK?” It has not been easy, and yet, it is exciting to stretch.

Now that I have introduced myself to you, let me continue to show you where I am now.

From that first workshop experience, I knew I had a hunger still to create art, a love for the work, a desire to improve my craft. I didn’t really have any idea where to go for help and my low self confidence held me back from just DOING it.

So here are my first suggestions. If you are just beginning with your painting, attending a workshop is a great idea. It is a situation where you have a person right in front of you to answer your questions and in addition, you have other aspiring artists with whom to connect. By asking others, you may find other workshops you would like to try or learning materials which helped other artists to improve and expand their work. Now remember, when I was starting out, there simply were no internet possibilities for learning which are so available now! Now YouTube for example has a plethora of instructional videos to watch and study, save to view later, with the idea of following your own particular direction. I definitely recommend you search these resources.

Many talented and accomplished artists write blogs which are filled with valuable information. There is literally an endless supply of assistance. There are online webinars to ‘attend’ in the comfort of your own home. In the near future, I will add links to my web site connecting to some webinars which have been valuable to me, and which were free to listen to: something important to my rather impecunious state. Johannes Vloothius was one of them. He has paint along videos as well, materials you can buy at very reasonable prices and his desire to teach seems to be important to him.

I am a researcher at heart, so I spent what was probably too large a segment of time researching all these materials, without actually DOING what was recommended. And yet, I did learn. It is a funny thing: you often don’t realize how much you know until you are asked a question or you try to instruct someone else! Suddenly as you freely talk about your passion, at a dinner party or whatever, the fog lifts and you happily proclaim to yourself, “Wow, I know a LOT about this!” That is what happened with me anyway. And remember, different people learn differently. Some are kinetic learners, needing to be busy DOING, and some are readers; some need to listen to instruction, and videos may be a preference offering better results. Find your best way to learn what you need to learn to be a better artist.

While delighted with my first watercolours resulting from that first workshop, and while thinking they were much better than I had any right to expect, I have to confess that now, from my present point of view, after much more painting, I can see the flaws and faults, and perhaps you will do the same. Don’t dwell on the shortcomings of your work– it won’t help you at all. They are just a step on a long and thrilling road. The pride I felt after so many years of NOT painting or even drawing, was a springboard for me to move forward and not give up. Concentrate on what you did well, what you created when you didn’t know you could! Stay inspired!!

Next: Creating Your Creative Space

(posted on 29 Oct 2016)

RENEWAL 1:HOW TO GET STARTED

Well here I am finally, ready to embark upon what I have been calling a new journey in my life as an artist. My intention is to implement all that I have learned over the years, all that I am currently learning, and learn more as I paint.

The reason why this is a ‘new’ journey is not that I am a new artist. Perhaps it would better be called a ‘RENEWING’ journey. I have been painting for some years now and loved art all my life. I have not been as fortunate as many who have painted all of their adult lives. I attended art college, but for many years following that experience, I was unable to embark upon my life as an artist, amateur or professional. The reasons are many and not required here. Let’s just say life intervened in a big way, as is often the case.

Whether you are an experienced artist, or brand new, I hope you will find something worthwhile in my blog posts during my journey. I will be sharing much of what I have learned over the years and what I have discovered by doing it myself. I have learned from other artists and art materials, some of which I will recommend. I am not being paid for this, but have collected materials over time, often from other professional and talented artists’ recommendation. I plan to share links to people and places on the internet which I have found helpful, either instructional or inspirational. Sometimes simply seeing what a particular artist is able to do with a particular medium is awe-inspiring and motivational in itself.

Many of us can understand having a dream to do or be something, yet being unable to make it a reality. I have ‘met’ many new artists in my face book group “Artists’ Tips and Tricks’ who have started to paint or draw as they retired from a full time job in the marketplace which had nothing to do with art. It is never too late to begin.

I would like to share some basic background to introduce myself. I grew up in Toronto, Ontario in Canada and attended the Ontario College of Art in Design there. I had a somewhat troubled life, managing to overcome some setbacks. There is no doubt that these kind of experiences can leave us without a strong self image, and without self confidence which was the case for me.

When the time was right I met the love of my life, my husband Darryl. He was and is a very talented singer/musician so life became centered on that which meant travelling on the road for the next 7 years. We were blessed with a son and settled in one place, while my husband continued with his supporting of our family, entertaining in resorts and clubs, and supplementing by doing any of the many things he is capable of doing. After a great deal of thought, we decided to home school our son, so my career became teaching for the next few years. Obviously, I had no time or energy for starting to paint and was feeling rather far away from my dream. I had not practised it for so long that I felt rather inept in those days, hearing the voice in my head which said I couldn’t do it.

I really didn’t even begin to use whatever painting skills I had until our son was grown enough to permit it. I began by attending a water colour workshop near where we lived, and my eyes were immediately opened to previously inconceivable possibilities and my heart was filled with the passion I thought I had lost. I still had something!

In my next post, I want to connect with anyone reading this by sharing the challenges and successes that followed, the perceived failures and frustrations. It seems that I literally condensed years of drawing and painting into a very short period of time. I hope you will stay with me.

(posted on 12 Nov 2014)

CHRISTIAN ART?

by

Lynne P Hollingsworth

In a time when one would be challenged to define in any cogent words, what art IS, what defines it, what categorizes something as 'ART'... I stand here to share my own artistic efforts, my own creations, my own art....But more specifically for this occasion and this gathering, I find myself wanting to talk about the Christian and his or her art, her creation, her outpouring of ..what? and from ...wartists we are so ready to pour ourselves out on canvas, or paper, or on stage, painting a target on our chests, presenting our innermost stirrings to be criticized or appreciated, denigrated or praised. I only know as an artist, I must do so. It could be said that we paint this imaginary target on ourselves when we walk in the world, when we leave our solitary spaces... but artists seem to really step OUT there...put it all OUT THERE... why?

Well, I did not chose art. Art chose me. I learned quickly however that when there is not peace in my spirit, I cannot create; when there is no calm in my heart, I cannot paint; when I am drained by the weariness of worldly things, I run dry. Yet I cannot be passive and stagnant for long, for the need to create is strong, imperative, incessant, challenging and necessary for my being.

We say a piece or a dance performance, or a song, is 'inspired'....it gladdens our heart, or brings us to tears... it touches us deeply for reasons we cannot fathom. In fact this essence of the unknowable withers under scrutiny, to my mind. Inspiration is not a mere myth. There exists a real inspiration, coming not from the Muses, but from the living God, which one is free to follow or not.

The so called ZONE of inspiration is an experiential thing. For me it is the time when I have submitted completely to God and His grace and mercy and love.... then there is an outpouring of this inspiration to the work. I cannot explain it, define it, or draw a picture of it: it just happens, but only if I am in the place to receive it. I believe deeply that my painting "Man of Sorrows" was given to me to execute to show me just how God can and does take me on the journey, as a passenger, following, and not as the captain. That position is taken, in my work, my words, and my life.

The entire soul of the artist reaches and rules his or her work. As a Christian, it is not for me to try to separate my art from my faith. I live and breathe and walk and speak and write and draw and paint my faith, by the Grace of God, with His mercy THROUGH faith. When I question what is happening, or bring too much worldly thought and criticism to it, I in fact, diminish the power that has been provided me. And self criticism is commonplace with artists, creators.... it can be argued that to view your own work with as much emotional distance as is possible can be a good thing, in that you strive to improve it, with technique, with mediums, with emphasis, hues and composition: however, that very emotional distance can turn a gifted piece, an inspired work, which perhaps even the artist doesn't herself understand, to an uninspired work.

It is absurd to try to dissociate in yourself, the artist and the Christian. They are one, if you are truly Christian...otherwise, your art may be isolated from your soul by some system of aesthetics. This is the trap.

If you want to make a Christian work, then be Christian, and simply try to make a beautiful work, into which your heart will pass; do not try to "make Christian."

I know an artist who paints wonderful landscapes and his name is Michael Godfrey. His artist statement is simple and profound --His desire is "that his paintings reflect the wonder of God's creation." I admire him greatly and hold him and his mission in high esteem.

An artist who is wholly a Christian creates Christian art. It may manifest in portraits that somehow portray more of the subject's inner existence, the soul and spirit of the subject; or a deeper illustration of how the artist SEES that spirit, shares its strength or vulnerability. A landscape may indeed have a more incandescent depth, something that bypasses the eyes and strikes the spirit within.

I have always said that my husband Darryl's singing, bypasses the ear in some way and passes directly into the heart. It is that aspect which I have experienced in his singing that defies scrutiny, correction, criticism or technological analysis: it simply IS. It exists, it moves, it touches, it inspires, it comforts, it is of God.

It overflows from a heart suffused by grace.

If someone finds something I have created "beautiful", I have to stress that any beauty which is perceived emanates from my heart, a heart filled with God's love and my awe and wonder; the wonder of the beauty around me, the masterful glory of the clouds in the sky.... therefore it flows, not from me, but from God. if something bypasses the eye and strikes the heart, then I have succeeded. So I continue. I am on a journey, as we all are, growing and learning.

I create because I must. I know I must strive not to please people, but to glorify God. Perhaps this is one of the most difficult aspects of the artistic journey: to learn to trust God completely in the face of worldly criticism and advice, well meant though it may be. Indeed, this is perhaps the challenge of the Christian on his or her journey PERIOD.

I must run my own race, surrounded and encouraged by those who have journeyed before me. I am Christian, and my art is, therefore Christian.

(posted on 9 Jul 2014)

Evolution of a Painting

...Or should I say “revolution” of a painting?

Have you ever had a painting you thought was coming along quite well, but you just knew it could be better? Perhaps the direction you were taking met a dead end?

Of course this can happen when you don't plan ahead with thumbnail sketches, composition assessments, and value sketches all designed to eliminate the need to take a sharp right turn during the painting process.

Well, I am afraid I sometimes let my brush get ahead of my brain, my paint get ahead of my plan, if I even HAD a completed plan. This is the story of a painting I THOUGHT was coming along just fine. I even 'kinda' liked it (high self praise for a self critical artist).

In the area in which I live, there are many lakes and rivers and consequently, many marsh areas, magnets for wildlife and flowers, a great source of interesting light reflections and daylight or weather changes which intrigue the artistic eye. Grasses, lily pads, flowering or not, trees, birds, clouds, shadows---all fodder for the artist either plein air, or photographed to be referenced for the studio process. I looked at many photos...this one is near my home.

I have many photographs taken from my area, and I often seek out other photos for reference on sites created specifically for artists, such as Paint my Photo. (http://paintmyphoto.ning.com/) Some of the photos on this page were copied from there.

...My process tends to be some sort of absorption of the myriad aspects that make up the appearance and FEELING of the subject I am painting... so wetlands bring to mind weeds, and mist perhaps, muted light, wildlife, lily pads.. the kind of place that would be silent except for bird calls, or frog croaks. I cannot explain it; I often look at many photos before I 'see' it in my mind.

What I have not mentioned is that I did paint a painting from my mind's eye, it sat in my studio for awhile, and I kept looking at it in a discontented way, so I actually started with a painting, hence "revolution" of a painting:

So, I began this painting, deciding on the grassy wetlands, and leaving the potential addition of wildlife as a later decision. I love the texture of wild grasses, the different shades of green and yellow, reds, and golds...against the blue and purple hues of the water.

I got rid of the row of evergreens, so I would have more depth, more sky and lowered my point of view to add to the depth of field.

As I said, I liked the direction it was taking (for these pieces seem to take their own direction at times) so I posted them on face book.

I am blessed to “know”, via face book, many talented artists, a favourite one of which is Michael Godfrey. He is a very talented artist who paints beautiful paintings. I was blessed with a dialogue with him about this painting and this is where my vision became reality.

He reminded me of some rudimentary, yet crucial, components to address in every painting, many of which could be lost in the enthusiasm of the artist. We have to address depth of field, warm colour verses cool colours (cooler in distance), fading intensity, the importance of the light affecting the mood...oh so much that I know in my brain, yet needed to add to this painting.

With that brief but potent input, I finished the painting, adding as you will see, depth with the cooler colours in the distance, warmer in the foreground; I added the source of light glowing as it does often in the clouds and reflections in the water....As Michael stated so well, “suble use and control of light” is something all artists need to learn and adopt in their work. Great advice from a great artist and one I consider a friend. Oh, I needed reminding!

So I did apply these things, and learned a great deal in the process, which is the aim of both the accomplished and the growing artist. Let me correct that--- all artists, whether accomplished as far as reputation and sales are concerned or not, are always growing; it is a great part of what we do, what we are called to do, and every work of art is a lesson. We learn as we do, including trying things that don't work: failing can only happen if you don't try!

Now, I have another painting with which I am not content... another 'revolution' work! And so it goes...

(posted on 27 Apr 2014)

CHAIR-ITY”

I ask you to forgive the play on words for this blog title. I simply couldn't resist.

I was asked recently to use whatever skills I possess to paint a 'Muskoka Chair' with some fine art design, determined by me, for a charity auction whose purpose was to raise funds for our local hospital fund. I was delighted to accept.

A Muskoka Chair is what is called elsewhere an Adirondack Chair, and this one had a unique feature in that it folded up, offering a new painting challenge.

I had painted a chair some time ago for another fund raising auction,

but it was not the folding kind.

My time was extremely limited, so I completed this work in one day. The previous day had been used to prepare the surface, already sanded, with layers of Gesso, and then tinted Gesso, in a pale blue shade that was part of my design plan. I used acrylic paints, professional grade. I have seen on the internet that some have done chairs with Latex, but I chose this route.

Here you can see the first layer of white Gesso being applied.

The chair had to be completely covered in several coats and I tinted the final coat with Ultramarine blue mixed with some white, a touch of red, umber and Dioxazine Purple until it reached the desired hue.

Once the pale blue was applied over the entire chair and allowed to dry, I mixed a darker blue from several colours for the background of the heron, representing water and sky.

And now I moved on to the actual design.

The first step was to draw the position of the Great Blue Heron, my subject, on the back of the chair, so that the feet would rest on the seat of the chair when completed. We see these birds around here quite often, and they are much beloved around our many lakes.

I carefully laid in a dark under painting for the body of the bird that would show through where I needed, in shadows or feathers.

Once dried, I worked on the head and body, building up colours and layers to catch the unique shading of this beautiful bird.

Once I was satisfied with my completed painting, it was sent to be sealed before going on to the auction.

My recommendations for this project include being able to spend more time than one day with it. While a pleasure to plan and execute, it is at times awkward to paint certain areas and the artist has to be aware of all the nooks and crannies of the chair, and how it will appear folded.

To do the painting, I had the chair on a table, the better to reach areas without bending which would tire me much more quickly. Remember to let the chair dry completely and cure, even with acrylics, before the sealing process.

Here is the finished chair.

I was pleased with the result although I do prefer canvas or paper as a support. The design has to take into account the spaces between the slats of the chair, and some subjects would not work on such an interrupted surface.

(posted on 20 Mar 2014)

Welcome to my second “first” blog. I call it my second because my first “first” blog was meant to be more of a smiling introduction, a bit of humour to break the ice for a reader receiving an invitation to read YET ANOTHER blog. I enjoyed writing it, had fun doing so, but now the time has come to write of many things, hopefully of a more useful nature for those who dare to venture here.

I read a post recently answering my question: “ What would YOU like to find in a blog?” (my own mini market survey) which suggested that there is a need among new artists, trained or self-taught, young or not, who have yet to show their work, for some practical suggestions about where and how to actually begin their journey. How does one BEGIN? With what tools or learning materials should one begin?

Goodness knows there are many, many books and videos out there with instruction and suggestions, enough to weigh down even the most arduous enthusiasm, but they can sometimes be either so numerous as to intimidate the new artist, impossible to whittle down to ideal selections, or too advanced for some to decipher. Especially for the uninitiated, the one who has not been schooled in art, this plethora of material can be, well, overwhelming.

Despite some training, I prefer to call myself self-taught. It is not something to be ashamed of, for the journey can be more difficult without a teacher, and usually longer, but very rewarding. It gave me time to develop, and find my way as a person first.

So I am very qualified to respond to this person's question. I know what it is to wonder where to begin, what tools to look for, what books to study, and I have bounced from pillar to post finding them AND my self-confidence.

I didn't know where to begin either. I was overwhelmed by the choices I found, the expertise of the artists whose work I admired online, and the expense of launching. My husband was extremely supportive and more than willing to head in whatever direction I chose, if I could only CHOOSE one.

I had begun as a child with drawing and had remained in that stage of development throughout the years of marriage and travelling for my husband's work, having our son, home schooling him through high school level and so on. It wasn't until our son had come to the place where he was teaching himself computer programming at college level, that I had the time to explore my options where my passion for art was concerned.

So, how did I begin?

A friend of mine who was aware of my love of drawing invited me to join her at a workshop being presented in my neighbourhood by a watercolour artist. This was my particular jump start experience. I went, I watched, I conquered! Well, it sure felt like conquering to me when I produced a painting that even I liked! Considering it was my first attempt in a workshop, I was delighted with what I created. Not too shabby for one who had never used watercolours before!

That first hurdle made the next ones easier to approach. For me, jumping in was easier with a life guard. I used what I had learned to paint more, setting up my own still life and experimenting more with my chosen medium, watercolour. Now I was brave enough to try some things on my own. I tried and failed and tried again. Was the work I produced my best work? Well at that particular time, YES! Now I would be hesitatant to show any of them. Others I have reworked until I could share them with people other than my very supportive family. There are one or two that I still like, for one reason or another, usually personal, but of course, I see the flaws clearly with more experience, which is a good thing. We ARE our own worst critics, but that can aid in development. Just try not to be TOO hard on yourself, a lesson I am still learning.

So I would suggest that a good way to begin to get over what I call “starter-stalling”, also known as FEAR of FAILURE, (or conversely Fear of Success) is to search out and attend a workshop of some kind, within your budget, in a medium that is interesting to you. If, like me, your budget is limited, you will find there are community workshops available at a more affordable price. And of course now there are workshops on DVD and online! I did not have those options back in the day.

However you do it, start with someone who has been there before, and grow and experiment from there! Ask questions, try new things, watch and learn. Don't reinvent the wheel; just get it turning for you! If watercolour isn't your style, try another medium. I find acrylics very user friendly. I happen to like their ease of clean up and their quick drying time. If I need more drying time, I can use acrylics that are made to dry more slowly, and work with them for a longer period of time on my canvas. Oils are amazing, and required considerable practice for me. They still do! Or draw with pen and ink, pencil or pastel, or yes, coloured pencils. I was amazed at what some artists create using coloured pencil!

The main thing is to start somewhere. Begin with the understanding that you must try and fail before you can learn and grow. You have to give yourself time to find your niche, your preferred technique; this won't happen unless you get your stuff together and show up at the easel, or the kitchen table.

There will always be those who can do something with higher quality or speed than you, so get over that now. Don't let that intimidate you! It would be easy to feel defeated by the awesome talent of other artists. You are not them and they are not YOU. You are unique. Your purpose is to find what YOU like, what YOU find joy doing, where your talent and abilities lie and then do THAT with all your heart

Read, research, soak up information. Get your 'but' out of the way, and forge what can be a joy-filled future doing what you love. Find a place to start and then learn as much as you can about what you have chosen. Or move on to some other medium. You don't know until you try and try again. The mature artists are still trying out things, and techniques, and learning as they paint. You will be amazed by the things that happen once the wheels are turning and the motor running! Experience is truly the best teacher!

Next time I will discuss some specifics I found helpful in my journey. I am adding links all the time, so feel free to check those out. “The Painter's Keys” is one of the best I have found anywhere online, along with FASO (Fine Art Studio Online). Just start your engines, my friend, and have fun on the trip!

I will also be sharing some of the best books I have found on the market.

(posted on 5 Mar 2014)

So, I am feeling very excited about publishing my first blog. Although it isn't actually my very FIRST blog, as it would be if I were a blog virgin, so to speak, since I have written some blogs for blogspot and Wordpress in past years. I just didn't like them very much, nor did I keep up the momentum, if indeed there WAS any momentum. Perhaps it was more moment than momentum.

It is, however, my first blog for my new Lynne P. Hollingsworth Fine Art web site, which won't be a huge revelation for those of you reading this, since you would have to have navigated TO the site to be here to, in fact, read it. However, I am, decidedly, excited! And yet, on second thought, perhaps I shouldn't be feeling excited. I mean, what if no one wants to read it after I publish it? Or worse, what if EVERYONE wants to read it and loves it and then I am expected to publish more and more and better and better? I am not feeling so excited any more. Just feeling a little sick.

Oh, but wait! There are so many topics about which I am passionate! There are so many important things about which one can in fact blog with a vengeance, not the least of which deals with the main focus of my site, a.k.a. " ART”, and the creation OF it. But then, on third thought, as my mind wanders the vast wasteland of randomness, the first subject that comes to my mind, for example, is the question: "why do bloggers and speakers begin sentences with the word “so”, when that word implies a continuation, not a beginning?" Then I look at the first word of my blog. Oh no!

So then I think, well, I promised a blog to my many followers. How many? I have no clue. At least a few. More than ONE? I DO have family. Oh wait, they won't read it, will they? So now I have to make a decision about just what to blog about. And perhaps more telling, what NOT to blog about! I am feeling sick again.

What will constitute the substance, the import, the incredible readability of my blog? I am passionate about self-esteem for women, and children, and people of all races. Ok, now I sound like Miss America making a trite speech.

I am passionate about God. OH, no, I can't write about THAT subject, because all those who believe something else will fail to follow me, and even, (ghastly thought), disagree with me. Of course, I don't know if any one at all will follow me anyway, so no need to obsess about THAT. And as for comments, well, that is what dialogue is about... or should I say "blogalogue"? CAN one say "blogalogue"? I DO feel strongly about following the teachings of Jesus Christ as best I can in my own life, and I believe it is right to stand up for what you believe in, so yes, I WILL write about that since it constitutes a great part of ME, and my life, and my philosophy of moving through this world. Hey, it might even make someone feel better about life, or themselves, or that friend who talks about Jesus! Bonus!

So then I think, I can't write about this or especially THAT because it may offend someone. I mean, someone is always getting offended. Some people seem to thrive on being offended. I suppose the latter could work in my favour! Oh wait! This is MY blog, so I can offend as many people as I want! I mean, IF I ever wanted to do so. Or to state my thoughts more clearly, it is beyond my power to affect their being offended, so what am I worried about? I don't WANT to offend any one! After all, I AM Canadian.

I could blog about Toronto mayor Rob Ford. Nah. Not worth the pixels, or keystrokes. A mayor like Mr. Ford is just ridicule personified, raised to a new and regrettable level. After all, I AM Canadian. I grew up in Toronto. Oh wait, I am not sure I want to confess that, in light of the apparent popularity of a cocaine- taking, foul-mouthed, wife- insulting politician. I mean who would believe that people who are allowed to walk around free from restraints, and to drive dangerous automobiles, actually support such reprobate behavior? Oh, I guess that IS blogging about him. So, I will hastily move on with determination after a regrettable minor digression. There goes 2 minutes of my life I can't get back.

I could write about the Academy Awards, which is a timely topic. I mean 'Oscar” is known by all and sundry, like him or not. I watched this show for the first time in a few years. Then again, the endless list of entertainment shows on the television schedule have slotted that in ad nauseum, rephrasing the obvious and exposing the erroneous. Opinions are scattered, varied, and over-expressed, so no, I won't go there. Further, anyway.

I despise animal cruelty, but then again, who doesn't? Oh wait! From the photos which have popped up on face book, I guess the word 'cruelty' has become a subjective standard, rather than a human one. So what would be the point? We all love the cute kitties and huggable puppies, and smart dolphins. Well, those who do not, won't be reading my blog. I move on.

Back to art, the titled target of my blog substance. Of course the very subject is rafe with a huge variance of opinion, endless vagaries of standards, creative angst that penetrates the very soul of the creative; a mulitiplicity of solutions and directions, ideas and categories, problems and solutions. The creative person runs the gamut from obsessed visonary incomprehensible to most, to the trite prettifier who is scathingly criticised.

The world of art is brimming with fakes and phonies, pontificators and pretenders, critics and contempt. And that is only the ones who write about it! The ones who actually create it, are marginally suffering from varying degrees of dysfunction. They see beauty where no one else can; they feel pain and express it when no one else dares to do so; they suffer the pangs of doubt and yet paint a target on their bodies, as well as on their easels, to better take the potshots and arrows of outrageous criticism and miscomprehension. They weather the climate of judgement with nervous stomachs and damp brows on frequent occasions and sign up to do it all over again; or they forge through with their image of strength girded with performance and stoicism.

Do you think I express this too strongly? Some may breeze through this trial by fire, having found the asbestos suit of confidence, of affirmation, of freedom. Is that not the very thing for which we all strive?

I want to share with you my journey, my observations, my interpretations. They are no one else's, only mine. Some will agree, at least I certainly hope so; some will not. A lifetime of experience and observations, of errors and reconciliations, of searching and grasping at shadows will be the basis of what you will find here. It may be about art; it may be about the challenge and the NEED to be creative. It may be about life around us, trite and sublime. It may be something that touches me deeply and raises my consciousness; it may be that which can drag one down if permitted.

Oh wait! What makes me think I am qualified to write a blog? I mean who do I think I am? Well, let me look at this strategically. I DO plan to be writing about life, and I AM living one! So that fits. And I have agreat many ideas running around my cerebral cortex about which I want to write. I have a lot to say and deserve a voice to SAY it! Then again, there are many out there with nothing to say who talk a LOT! I am feeling a bit nauseous again.

Ah, but wait! I have lived an interesting life, thus far, by any standard. I have lived quite a number of years, so far, and hopefully gained wisdom. I have experienced a multitude of emotions, trials, joys and milestones. I have looked back on the fun in “dsyfunctional”. I have dealt with health issues, and survived. I have dealt with parents, and survived. I have dealt with parentHOOD and survived, so far. I have been a performer, puppeteer and poet. Ok, not a PUBLISHED poet, but still...it rhymes. I have been accused of having great insight, and if indeed that is true, then, wow, that is well worth sharing! I might even brighten someone's day!

So, blog I will. Join me on the journey, the expression, the uncovering before you of that which I have seen and learned and observed, what I have yet to learn, discern and decode. You have a formal invitation. Join my mailing list, please! You might just get something!

And in the meantime, don't take life too seriously. This I have learned over time. Write with passion, paint with purpose, learn with dedication, but laugh with enthusiasm. Life is short, the present, a gift...Live it, and enjoy it.

Oh, and by the way, will someone just tell Justin Bieber to grow up and show some class for heaven's sake?

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